Diforc'hioù etre adstummoù "Gwrizienn (yezhoniezh)"

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Diverradenn ebet eus ar c'hemm
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Er [[yezhoniezh]] e vez implijet an termen '''gwrizienn ''' ([[Saozneg|saoz]]: [[:en:Root (linguistics)|''root'']]) evit komz eus [[Morfemenn|elfenn]] [[Penn (yezhoniezh)|bennañ]] ur ger. N'ahllhall ket ur wriziennbezañwrizienn bezañ isrannet e tammoù bihanoc'h hag enni e kaver an darn vrasañ eus an danvez [[Semantik|semantikel]], da skouer:
 
: "ti"
[[Content word]]s in nearly all [[language]]s contain, and may consist only of, root [[morpheme]]s. However, sometimes the term "root" is also used to describe the word minus its [[inflection]]al endings, but with its lexical endings in place. For example, ''chatters'' has the inflectional root or [[lemma (linguistics) | lemma]] ''chatter'', but the lexical root ''chat''. Inflectional roots are often called [[stem (linguistics) | stems]], and a root in the stricter sense may be thought of as a monomorphemic stem.
: "den"
: "kador"
 
E hogozik holl yezhoù ar bed ez eus e pep [[ger arc'hwelus]] (saoz. [[:en:Function word|''funtion word'']]) d'an nebeutañ ur wrizienn ha pe c'hoazh ur wrizienn da [[Morfemenn|vorfemenn]] nemeti hepmuiken zoken.
Roots can be either [[free morpheme]]s or [[bound morpheme]]s. Root morphemes are essential for [[affixation]] and [[compound (linguistics) | compound]]s.
 
Talvezout a ra ar wrizienn da [[Penn (yezhoniezh)|benn]] ur [[ger kevrennek]].
The root of a word is a unit of meaning (morpheme) and, as such, it is an abstraction, though it can usually be represented in writing as a word would be. For example, it can be said that the root of the English verb form ''running'' is ''run'', or the root of the Spanish superlative adjective ''amplísimo'' is ''ampli-'', since those words are clearly derived from the root forms by simple suffixes that do not alter the roots in any way. In particular, English has very little inflection, and hence a tendency to have words that are identical to their roots. But more complicated inflection, as well as other processes, can obscure the root; for example, the root of ''mice'' is ''mouse'' (still a valid word), and the root of ''interrupt'' is, arguably, ''rupt'', which is not a word in English and only appears in derivational forms (such as ''disrupt'', ''corrupt'', ''rupture'', etc.). The root ''rupt'' is written as if it were a word, but it's not.
 
A-wezhoù e vez implijet an tremen "gwrizienn" en un doare ledanoc'h evit komz ivez eus [[Kelf (yezhoniezh)|kelfoù]] (saoz. [[:en:Word stem|''stem'']]) ar gerioù, da lâret eo stumm diazez ur ger bennak hep al [[lostger|lostgerioù]] [[Kevreadurezh|kevreadurezhel]] ([[deveradur]], d.s. displegadur ur [[verb]] pe [[Troad (yezhoniezh)|troadoù]] un [[Anv-kadarn|anv]]) met gant an holl [[kenger|kengerioù]] semantikel, da skouer:
This distinction between the word as a unit of speech and the root as a unit of meaning is even more important in the case of languages where roots have many different forms when used in actual words, as is the case in [[Semitic language]]s. In these, roots are formed by [[Triliteral | consonants alone]], and different words (belonging to different parts of speech) are derived from the same root by inserting vowels. For example, in [[Hebrew language|Hebrew]], the root '''''gdl''''' represents the idea of largeness, and from it we have '''''g'''a'''d'''o'''l''''' and '''''gd'''o'''l'''a'' (masculine and feminine forms of the adjective "big"), '''''g'''a'''d'''a'''l''''' "he grew", ''hi'''gd'''i'''l''''' "he magnified" and ''ma'''gd'''e'''l'''et'' "magnifier", along with many other words such as '''''g'''o'''d'''e'''l''''' "size" and ''mi'''gd'''a'''l''''.
 
:<u>Gwrizienn unanvorfemek: Gwrizienn rik<u>
=== Reconstructed roots ===
:: ''ad'''wel'''omp'''
 
:<u>Gwrizienn liesvorfemek: Kelf<u>
:: '''''adwel'''omp'''
 
Ur wrizienn c'hell bezañ koulz ur [[Morfemenn stag|vorfemenn stag]] hag ur [[Morfemenn distag|vorfemenn distag]], da skouer:
 
:<u>Gwrizienn: morfemenn stag<u>
:: "kon", d.s "dour'''gon'''"
::(<smallel lec'hioù ma ne vez ket implijet ar ger-se evel liester boas ar ger "ki"</small)
 
:<u>Gwrizienn: morfemenn distag<u>
:: "penn", d.s. "di'''benn''añ
 
Kealoù difestis eo ar gwrizienn ha ne rankont ket klotaat dre ret gant gerioù implijet er yezh a-hendall.
 
This distinction between the word as a unit of speech and the root as a unit of meaning is even more important in the case of languages where roots have many different forms when used in actual words, as is the case in [[Semitic language]]s. In these, roots are formed by [[Triliteral | consonants alone]], and different words (belonging to different parts of speech) are derived from the same root by inserting vowels. For example, in [[Hebrew language|Hebrew]], the root '''''gdl''''' represents the idea of largeness, and from it we have '''''g'''a'''d'''o'''l''''' and '''''gd'''o'''l'''a'' (masculine and feminine forms of the adjective "big"), '''''g'''a'''d'''a'''l''''' "he grew", ''hi'''gd'''i'''l''''' "he magnified" and ''ma'''gd'''e'''l'''et'' "magnifier", along with many other words such as '''''g'''o'''d'''e'''l''''' "size" and ''mi'''gd'''a'''l''''.
 
The root of a word, in [[etymology]], has a somewhat different meaning: it may represent an older form. When several languages are believed to be children of one older language, linguists will compare each language to the rest, trying to find matching words and ultimately reconstruct the ancient root. This has been done with several major language families, such as the [[Indo-European languages]] and the Semitic family.
 
==Gwelit ivez:==
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