Diforc'hioù etre adstummoù "Plac'h nevez"

170 okted lamet ,  13 vloaz zo
Diverradenn ebet eus ar c'hemm
D (Lamet kuit eo bet ar restr ''Indian-bride.jpg'' peogwir e oa bet diverket war Commons gant Zscout370)
[[Image:Cab-card-wis-front.jpg|thumb|left|310px|Luc'hskeudenn eus tud nevez er bloavezhioù 1870 pe 1880, ar plac'h nevez gwisket e gwenn.]]
 
Ar '''plac'h nevez''' a vez graet eus ar [[plac'h]] o timeziñ da zeiz hec'h [[eured]], hag a-wechoù un tamm a-raok (met an ''danvez-pried'' a vez laret kentoc'h) pe un tamm goude zoken. Ar [[paotr nevez]] a vez graet eus he fried, hag an ''dud nevez'' anezho o-daou.
 
Plac'hed a enor (unan da vihanañ) a vez war-dro ar plac'h nevez en deiz-se.
Ar '''plac'h nevez''' a vez graet eus ar [[plac'h]] o timeziñ da zeiz hec'h [[eured]], hag a-wechoù un tamm a-raok (met an ''danvez-pried'' a vez laret kentoc'h) pe un tamm goude.
 
==Dilhad ar plac'h nevez==
<!--A bride is typically attended by one or more [[bridesmaid]]s or [[maid of honor|maids of honor]]. Her partner, if male, is the [[bridegroom]] or "groom", after the wedding, in [[marriage]], her [[husband]]. The term is applicable during the first year of wifehood.
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== Legal requirements ==
 
== History ==
 
[[Image:Cab-card-wis-front.jpg|thumb|left|310px|A photograph of a [[wedding party]] probably from the late 1870s to 1880s.''(Note the black or dark colored [[white wedding|wedding]] dress which was common during the early to mid 19th century.)'']]The term appears in combination with many words, some of them obsolete. Thus "bridegroom" is the newly married man, and "bride-bell," "bride-banquet" are old equivalents of wedding-bells, wedding-breakfast. "Bridal" (from ''Bride-ale''), originally the wedding-feast itself, has grown into a general descriptive adjective, e.g. the [[wedding party|''bridal'' party]], the ''bridal'' ceremony. The [[wedding cake|''bride-cake'']] had its origin in the Roman ''confarreatio'', a form of marriage, the essential features of which were the eating by the couple of a cake made of salt, water and [[spelt]] flour, and the holding by the bride of three wheat-ears, symbolical of plenty.
 
[[Image:Cab-card-wis-front.jpg|thumb|left|310px|A photograph of a [[wedding party]] probably from the late 1870s to 1880s.''(Note the black or dark colored [[white wedding|wedding]] dress which was common during the early to mid 19th century.)'']]The term appears in combination with many words, some of them obsolete. Thus "bridegroom" is the newly married man, and "bride-bell," "bride-banquet" are old equivalents of wedding-bells, wedding-breakfast. "Bridal" (from ''Bride-ale''), originally the wedding-feast itself, has grown into a general descriptive adjective, e.g. the [[wedding party|''bridal'' party]], the ''bridal'' ceremony. The [[wedding cake|''bride-cake'']] had its origin in the Roman ''confarreatio'', a form of marriage, the essential features of which were the eating by the couple of a cake made of salt, water and [[spelt]] flour, and the holding by the bride of three wheat-ears, symbolical of plenty.
 
Under Tiberius the cake-eating fell into disuse, but the wheat ears survived. In the middle ages they were either worn or carried by the bride. Eventually it became the custom for the young girls to assemble outside the church porch and throw grains of wheat over the bride, and afterwards a scramble for the grains took place. In time the wheat-grains came to be cooked into thin dry biscuits, which were broken over the bride's head, as is the custom in Scotland to-day, an oatmeal cake being used. In Elizabeth's reign these biscuits began to take the form of small rectangular cakes made of eggs, milk, sugar, currants and spices. Every wedding guest had one at least, and the whole collection were thrown at the bride the instant she crossed the threshold. Those which lighted on her head or shoulders were most prized by the scramblers. At last these cakes became amalgamated into a large one which took on its full glories of almond paste and ornaments during Charles II.'s time. But even to-day in rural parishes, e.g. north Notts, wheat is thrown over the bridal couple with the cry "Bread for life and pudding for ever," expressive of a wish that the newly wed may be always affluent. The throwing of rice, a very ancient custom but one later than the wheat, is symbolical of the wish that the bridal may be fruitful.
Image:Kalmyk Brides and Grooms.jpg|Two [[Astrakhan]] [[Kalmyk people|Kalmyk]] brides.
 
Image:Shinto married couple.jpg|BridePlac'h atnevez aen un eured [[Shintoshinto]] Image:Muslim wedding in India.jpg|Plac'h nevez muzulman en India
Image:Muslim wedding in India.jpg|Plac'h nevez muzulman en India
Image:19+handfasting+by+gordon.jpg|[[Neopagan]] bride and groom
Image:Bride-veil.jpg|Plac'h nevez endan ur [[gouel|ouel]]
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