Pietro Aretino : diforc'h etre ar stummoù

9 okted ouzhpennet ,  14 vloaz zo
Diverradenn ebet eus ar c'hemm
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== E vuhez ==
Ganet en [[Arezzo]] (''Aretino'', "eus Arezzo"). N'eo ket deskdurezh vras en doe eno, ha harluet e voe. Chom a reas e [[Perugia]] e-pad un dek vloaz bennak a-raok mont da Roma. Eno e voe gwarezet gant [[Agostino Chigi]], un arc'hantour bras a oa gwarezour [[Raffaello]]. Pa varvas [[Hanno an olifant]], un aneval a oa d'ar pab [[Leon X]], e [[1514]], e skrivas Aretino ur flemmskrid anvet "Youl Diwezhañ ha Testamant an Olifant Hanno." Er skrid-se e rae goap ouzh tud veur kêr Roma, politikerien ha tud a iliz, hag ouzh ar pab zoken. Berzh a reas, ha brudet e voe Aretino evel paotr ar flemmskridoù ha lesanvet e voe ...
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<!--Born out of wedlock in ... There the rich banker and patron of took him under his wing.
 
The pamphlet was such a success that it kickstarted 's career and established him as a famous satirist, ultimately known as "the Scourge of Princes."
Born out of wedlock in [[Arezzo]] (''Aretino'', "from Arezzo"), very casually educated then banished from his native city, Aretino spent a formative decade in Perugia, before being sent, highly recommended, to Rome. There [[Agostino Chigi]], the rich banker and patron of [[Raffaello]], took him under his wing.
 
When [[Hanno the elephant]], pet of [[Pope Leo X]], died in [[1514]], Aretino penned a satirical pamphlet entitled "The Last Will and Testament of the Elephant Hanno." The fictitious will cleverly mocked the leading political and religious figures of [[Rome]] at the time, including [[Pope Leo X]] himself. The pamphlet was such a success that it kickstarted Aretino's career and established him as a famous satirist, ultimately known as "the Scourge of Princes."
 
Aretino prospered, living from hand to mouth as a hanger-on in the literate circle of his patron, sharpening his satirical talents on the gossip of politics and the papal [[Roman Curia|Papal Curia]], and turning the coarse Roman [[pasquinade]] into a rapier weapon of satire, until his sixteen ribald ''Sonetti Lussuriosi'' written to accompany [[Giulio Romano]]'s exquisitely beautiful but utterly pornographic series drawings engraved by [[Marcantonio Raimondi]] under the title ''[[I Modi]]'' finally caused such outrage that he had to temporarily flee Rome.
''La cortigiana'' is a brilliant parody of [[Baldassare Castiglione|Castiglione’s]] ''[[The Book of the Courtier|Il Cortegiano]]'', and features the adventures of a Sienese gentleman, Messer Maco, who travels to Rome to become a [[cardinal (Catholicism)|cardinal]]. He would also like to win himself a mistress, but when he falls in love with a girl he sees in a window, he realizes that only as a courtier would he be able to win her. In mockery of Castiglione's advice on how to become the perfect courtier, a charlatan proceeds to teach Messer Maco how to behave as a courtier: he must learn how to deceive and flatter, and sit hours in front of the mirror.
 
Aretino was a close friend of [[Titian]], who painted his [[portrait]] (''illustrations'') at least three times... The early portrait is a psychological study of alarming modernity. Clement VII made Aretino a [[Knight of Rhodes]], and [[Julius III]] named him a Knight of St. Peter, but the chain he wears for his [[1545]] portrait may have merely been jewelry. In his strictly-for-publication letters to patrons Aretino would often add a verbal portrait to Titian's painted one.
 
"He is said to have died of suffocation from [[Fatal hilarity|laughing too much]]."<ref>Waterfield, Gordon, ed. ''First Footsteps in East Africa'', (New York: Praeger Publishers, 1966) pg. 59 footnote.</ref>
 
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"HeMignon ise saidoa tod'al havelivour diedTizian, ofa suffocationreas fromtri [[Fatalfoltred hilarity|laughinganezhañ. toomervel much]]a reas, a lavarer, diwar tagañ o c'hoarzhin."<ref>Waterfield, Gordon, ed. ''First Footsteps in East Africa'', (New York: Praeger Publishers, 1966) pg. 59 footnote.</ref>
==Notennoù==
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